Monday, January 8, 2018

The Magician's Book: A Skeptic's Adventures in Narnia by Laura Miller (2008)

  In library land, all nonfiction books get subject headings, and The Magician's Skeptic has these:  


  • Lewis, C. S. (Clive Staples), 1898-1963 -- Criticism and interpretation.
  • Lewis, C. S. (Clive Staples), 1898-1963. Chronicles of Narnia.
  • Lewis, C. S. (Clive Staples), 1898-1963 -- Appreciation.
  • Lewis, C. S. (Clive Staples), 1898-1963 -- Influence.
  • Children's stories, English -- History and criticism.
  • Fantasy fiction, English -- History and criticism.

I'm in heaven.  Big blissful sigh.  There is something very rewarding about reading something very well written that is about a book that you love dearly, a piece of writing that expertly, lovingly, but also objectively appreciates a book, discusses the influence of a book, explores the history of the book, and adeptly practices literary criticism upon the book (without totally ruining the book forever and ever).  Miller can't possibly personally ruin Narnia because she loves the books so much.  Like so many readers and writers out there, Narnia was Milller's- and my - first literary adventure, that book that all other books and stories are judged against, that place you so desperately wanted to be real, the literary touchstone.   Her book details her love for Narnia, and how she fell out of love, but back into appreciation and respect for the books.  Along the way, she writes about Lewis's own literary influences, his friendship and falling out with Tolkien, his education and background, career and Christianity, his ideas about myth making and storytelling.  And, most importantly, she writes about Narnia:  his ideas of Narnia, other authors ideas of Narnia (Neil Gaiman!), and her ideas about Narnia.  

I was not ready for this book to end - I'm sort of at a loss for what to read next!


The Magician's Book: A Skeptic's Adventures in NarniaThe Magician's Book: A Skeptic's Adventures in Narnia by Laura Miller
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

There is something very rewarding about reading something very well written that is about a book that you love dearly, a piece of writing that expertly, lovingly, but also objectively appreciates a book, discusses the influence of a book, explores the history of the book, and adeptly practices literary criticism upon the book (without totally ruining the book forever and ever). Miller can't possibly personally ruin Narnia because she loves the books so much; this is not her goal here. Like so many readers and writers out there, Narnia was Milller's- and my - first literary adventure, that book or books that all other books and stories are judged against, that place you so desperately wanted to be real, the literary touchstone. This book details her love for Narnia, how she fell out of love, and back into appreciation and respect for the books and the author. Along the way, she writes about Lewis's own literary influences, his friendship and falling out with Tolkien, his education and background, career and Christianity (and her own lack of faith), his ideas about myth making and storytelling. And, most importantly, she writes about Narnia: his ideas of Narnia, other authors ideas of Narnia (Neil Gaiman!), and her ideas about Narnia. This book was bliss.


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